Thursday, 23 October 2008

Snorkeller dies between flags and your BBQ

A man has died while snorkelling between the flags in shallow water at a patrolled beach near Cairns. "He was swimming between the flags on the public beach on Green Island, which is a well-populated patrolled area with a lifeguard on duty." No less than four tourists have died in the waters off the island in the past three years.

Barking Mad asks, why not ban swimming - it can kill. We ban dogs, also accused of killing.

Swimming and dogs provide an undisputed benefit to our society.
Why then, does one death from a dog (prov0ked by the victim) result in a virtual ban on hunting dogs that protect the pastures required so we can have our steaks, BBQ snags and lamb roasts?
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Barking Mad: While I grieve for the family and try to comprehend their loss (I lost a sister to cancer at age 30 and several friends to 'early' deaths), the fact that this story has received virtually NO media coverage and NO legislative changes bothers me. PLEASE read this with a view to the bigger picture and not the individual suffering to those immediately involved. Sudden and unexpected death is becoming socially unacceptable in our medical-miracle society despite the fact that death is the only certainly in our lives.

  • In NSW, we had one 'tragic' death of a child that could be blamed on DOGS (not DocS), and it was. Even though in the subsequent inquiry it was found that 20, YES TWENTY risk of harm reports were received at the DoCS helpline concerning domestic violence, alcohol and drug use in the family of the child involved in the incident blamed on DOGS.
Before the facts were determined, legislation was brought in so that any dog that caused a person to feel afraid could be declared 'dangerous'; guilty before proven. It was a haven for dog-haters; don't like your neighbours dog - call your local council and say you felt fear - your identity would be protected and the dog would be guilty before proven. The proof may come out a year and $30,000 later, but in the interim pooch (if not put down) would be living on a 10M x 10M concrete slab with 2M high fences.
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YOUR BBQ & YOUR LAMB ROAST: How eating beef and pork contributes to animal cruelty.
  1. The coroner has recommended enforcement of the dangerous dog provisions for hunting dogs.
  2. Cattle and sheep are grazing animals for the majority of their life.
  3. Feral pigs "are a problem in NSW, QLD and NT. Impacts include pasture damage, water fouling, disease spread and the huge costs of control. Lamb losses of 15% to pigs is common, and can be up to 38%." Factsheet.
  4. On the ground hunting with pig dogs is an effective control method.
  5. But hunting dogs must now be de-sexed, muzzled and kept in an enclosure with a concrete floor.
  6. Just like any other working dog, you want to breed from your best. But if they have to be de-sexed before they even start working - how will this work?

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

This is crazy. A pig dog in NSW now needs to be enclosed in an area not less than 10 square metres and on a floor constructed of sealed concrete!

Yet the same state has a law preventing cruelty and requiring
a person in charge of an animal NOT to confine the animal in a cage that does not allow the animal adequate exercise.

HUH? And I'm suppose to muzzle my pig dogs unless legally hunting? Where does hunting start - when they are out of their concrete prison, jumping off the ute (where any responsible hunter would have them in a crate)?

Eedra at Barking Mad said...

THERE IS MORE - The pig dog can't be declared dangerous because it is hunting VERMIN. But then NSW has an extra-ordinary definition of VERMIN in this law, restricting it to "BIRDS AND SMALL RODENTS".

I can't imagine our ornithologists would be happy to know that it's OK for dogs to chase and retrieve birds.

http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/invasive/publications/pig/pubs/pig.pdf